From a recent article in the New York Times:

In Drive to Unionize, Fast-Food Workers Walk Off the Job

Jonathan Westin, organizing director at New York Communities for Change, a community group that is playing a central role in the effort, said hundreds of workers had already voiced support for the campaign, called Fast Food Forward.. . . . .The sponsors of the fast-food campaign also include UnitedNY.org, the Black Institute and the Service Employees International Union, a powerful union that is playing a quiet but important role behind the scenes.

Several religious leaders are backing the effort. "I've become involved because it is primarily a matter of justice," said the Rev. Michael Walrond of the First Corinthian Baptist Church in Harlem. "We seek to protect those who are the most vulnerable in our culture, and some of the most vulnerable people in the city are fast-food workers who work for poverty wages."

 

A message from FastFoodForward.org

Click on the image to sign the petition.

 

This week, we were shocked to see major news outlets reporting that the rise in McDonald's profits signals a rebound for the global economy. (1) While McDonald's is expected to earn 27.5 billion dollars in revenue this year, McDonald's workers have little to celebrate--scraping together what few dollars they have for presents for their kids, using food stamps for survival, and continuing their fight for a living wage.

McDonald's workers are proud of the work they do everyday and, as members of the McDonald's family, they deserve a fair share--a livable salary in return for their hard work and a way to feed their families without public assistance. While you and 125,000 others have stood with the fast food workers of New York City to demand higher wages--McDonald's has remained silent.

Will you help us get their attention? Tweet at McDonald's and ask them when they will raise wages for their workers AND share this image on Facebook.

According to a study from the Economic Policy Institute, 73.6% of workers in the food service industry lived at or below the poverty line in 2010--more than any other profession.(2) Because of this, many workers rely on public assistance to fill the gap; and it's taxpayers like you--not the CEOs--who are paying the price.

Last year, McDonald's then-CEO earned $8.75 million, while their workers struggled to support families on as little as $11,000 a year. This year, while McDonald's is slated to earn $27.5 billion in revenue, they're not the only ones making it big in the industry--YUM Brands (Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, and KFC) is expected to take in $13.6 billion and Wendy's $2.5 billion.(3) McDonald's and the other corporations keep pretending they can't afford to pay their workers a living wage--but the numbers tell a different story.

Don't let McDonald's off the hook--take part on Twitter and Facebook to demand higher wages for fast food workers.

We're not just fighting to change McDonalds, or Pizza Hut, or Wendy's--momentum is growing around the country to organize low wage workers. From fighting union-busting legislation in Michigan to the many workers who are risking everything to go on strike--we are prepared to fight. We're organizing to transform an entire industry notorious for low wages and mistreatment of its workers. The fight isn't going to be short, and its definitely not going to be easy. But your support goes a long way toward showing us that we're not alone.


Forward,
Samhita and the Fast Food Forward Team

(1) The Washington Post: December 10, 2012.  http://wapo.st/RWGtQa

(2)The Economic Policy Institute: April 27, 2012. http://bit.ly/IwAXd5

(3) Bloomberg Businessweek: December 13, 2012. http://buswk.co/W2lX1Nhttp://buswk.co/UoTZHS and http://buswk.co/UoTZHS


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